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Health

Urinary Issues in Cats

Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD) and Feline Urologic Syndrome (FUS) are not just one problem, but a myriad of clinical symptoms involving the cat’s urinary system. It is very important to address these with your veterinarian promptly. Symptoms include:

  • Painful or more frequent urination
  • Prolonged squatting in the litter box
  • Increased visits to the litter box
  • Bloody or cloudy urine
  • Dribbling urine
  • Excessive licking at the urinary opening
  • Excessive water intake
  • Inability to urinate

 

FLUTD and FUS can have many different causes which include:

  • Cystitis (inflammation of the bladder)
  • Bladder stones, crystals, or debris
  • Urinary tract blockage
  • Trauma to the urinary tract
  • Congenital abnormality
  • Tumor
  • Cancer

 

Male cats are more prone to urethral blockage due to their narrow urethras which is the tube that carries the urine from the bladder. Urinary blockage can lead to rupture of the bladder and/or kidney failure.

Urinary problems can be very serious and potentially fatal if left untreated. If you notice any of the symptoms listed above—seek immediate veterinary care for your cat or kitten.

The Importance of Heartworm Prevention

The importance of heartworm prevention cannot be overstated. Heartworm disease is caused by the bite of a mosquito that is a carrier of the disease. Heartworm is not spread from pet to pet—it is only caused by the bite of a mosquito. Heartworm disease causes lung disease, heart failure, damage to other organs, and death in dogs, cats, and ferrets. It has been reported in all 50 states, but is prevalent along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.

Your pet is at risk for contracting heartworm disease even if he or she lives inside or only goes outside briefly. Mosquitos do get into homes and can be found in our area throughout the year. This puts your pet at constant risk. Year round prevention is strongly recommended!

Your pet should be tested for heartworm disease before a preventive treatment is started. This can be done in minutes at your veterinarian’s office. If your pet is negative for heartworm disease—a preventive treatment should be started immediately. There are many options available for heartworm prevention. These include chewable and non-chewable tablets, topical liquids that are applied to the skin, and injectable products. Ask your veterinarian which is the best choice for your pet.

If your pet is diagnosed with heartworm disease the treatment is not easy on the pet physically or on the owner’s finances. The treatment includes an injection with an arsenic-containing drug, exercise restrictions, other oral medications and/or topical medications. Treatment can be very toxic to the pet and can cause serious complications including blood clots in the lungs. It also requires multiple veterinary visits and possibly hospitalization. The cost for treatment can add up quickly.

For the sake of your pet’s health please talk with your veterinarian about using a heartworm preventive. It could save your pet’s life and save you a lot of money in the long run.

Diabetes

Diabetes in pets is common in the veterinary world. Genetics, certain breeds, obesity, and underlying diseases can be factors for diabetes. Most pets with diabetes will need to be managed and monitored for the rest of their lives. In some cases, diet and weight loss can cause a remission of the disease.

What Are the Symptoms?

Early Stages/Uncomplicated

  • Increased thirst and urination
  • Increased appetite
  • Increased possibility of infections, such as urinary tract infections

Severe/Ketoacidosis

  • Depression
  • Vomiting
  • Severe weight loss
  • Trouble breathing
  • Coma/loss of consciousness

If early signs of diabetes are present, the testing is often simple. There are two ways to check for diabetes. Both are quick and these tests can be run in the hospital for immediate results:

  • Bloodwork is run to check blood glucose levels. Depending on when your pet last ate, glucose levels should range from 80-120. New unmanaged diabetics often have numbers in the 200s to 300s.
  • Urine is also collected and checked for Ketones or sugar. When the blood glucose is over 180 the kidneys are unable to filter the sugar and it is released into the urine. When both blood and urine sugar is positive, a diagnosis of diabetes is made and insulin should be given immediately.

When starting to care for a diabetic pet, most hospitals will provide owners with an in-depth diabetic consult. This includes showing owners how to administer insulin, providing them with safety tips, noting the symptoms to watch for, and providing other important diabetic disease information. This consult gives the pet owner the knowledge and confidence to manage their pet’s diabetes at home.

After starting insulin more blood testing is done until the appropriate dose of insulin is found. Your pet might have to make several day trips to the vet until blood glucose levels are regulated. Diabetes can then be managed from home with the owner’s vigilance with regard to administering insulin and observing the patient for any changes. At-home glucometers can be purchased through your veterinarian. They can enable owners to check levels immediately in case of a potential emergency.

Diabetes can be a daunting diagnosis at first but with your veterinarian’s help—your pet can live comfortably and happily for many years.

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